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Making Reading Fun

Summer Series Recap: Making Reading Fun

News / July 11, 2022

The Point

We constantly encourage reading to our students and are looking to ‘hook’ them in the habit of reading regularly, but are we reading for fun for ourselves? Reading has been proven to reduce stress and also models the thing we want for our students: strong, fun literacy.

 

Making Reading Fun

Make it a part of your day

Like most other things, to make reading a habit, you’ll have to create intentional time and space for it. If reading alone seems unappealing, ask a friend or family member to join you! Create your own book club or join an established one (it’s also a great excuse to enjoy an adult beverage on a summer afternoon – while also discussing the book, of course).

 

Decide what to read

If you’re creating a book club, consider taking turns picking the book. If you’re joining an established book club, take time to preview the books they have picked in the past to determine if it’s the right fit. If you’re reading independently, you might want to browse through some online lists, find “book-Tok”, or follow some IG book clubs.

 

Make it accessible

Buying books can add up over time! Use resources – local, national, and virtual – to make access to books more affordable. Never forget the old faithful: libraries. But, also consider second-hand stores, book apps, book subscriptions, and audiobooks.

 

Try Audio Books

Sometimes we, as teachers, need to double task. Going on a walk? Instead of music, use Libby from the Library and download a free audiobook. Driving? Flip on your audio book! Cooking dinner? Audiobook time.

You’ll be breezing through stories! Some people only do fiction on audiobook- others only do non-fiction. Try both and see if one way helps you better enjoy or learn!

 

Set a goal (but make sure it’s achievable!)

When it comes down to it, adults aren’t that different from kids. When setting a goal for how many books to read, make sure it’s reasonable. Feeling successful in meeting (or being on track to meet) your goal can offer additional motivation to continue. Haven’t finished a book in a while? Maybe don’t set a goal of reading a book a week this year…

 

 

Resources

Looking for content to dive deeper into this topic? Check out these links below for further readings and a podcast related to this topic.

Apps:

  • OverdriveOverDrive is a free service offered by your library or school that lets you borrow digital content”
  • Libby – “Libby is a free app where you can borrow ebooks, digital audiobooks, and magazines from your public library. You can stream titles with Wi-Fi or mobile data, or download them for offline use and read anytime, anywhere. All you need to get started is a library card.”
  • SCRIBD – “Scribd Inc. is an American e-book and audiobook subscription service that includes one million titles. Scribd hosts 60 million documents on its open publishing platform”
  • Goodreads – “Goodreads is the world’s largest site for readers and book recommendations. Our mission is to help people find and share books they love.”

 

Instagram Accounts: 

  • Blk+brwn: Local – Amplifying Black and Brown storytelling
  • DA Lit Mamas: Two mothers share this account of reviewing books

 

Websites: 

 

 

The Author 

 

This edition was written by Tawar Khalandi – a former KCTR resident & graduate, and current KCTR Alum and Coach. Tawar has set (and failed at meeting) countless reading-related goals in the past. Luckily, it hasn’t completely deterred her from reading. At the time of writing this, Tawar is listening to Caste on Libby and reading Beautiful Ruins in print. Hopefully, by the time you’re reading this, she will have completed both (but no promises). Want to read more from our Summer Series? Check out our other blog posts!